Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Krazy Glue on Your Skin?

This press release was too far out to ignore. I had to share it with you! I'll admit this feature is akin to Chanel's use of Brad Pitt for advertising. The "novelty" drew more attention than they had ever hoped.

Dr. Neill Schultz is a leading, board-certified dermatologist has maintained a thriving medical practice, Park Avenue Skin Care, on the Upper East Side of New York City for the last 30 years. He focuses on general and cosmetic dermatology, seeing over 10,000 patient visits per year. This month, Dr. Schultz offered an unconventional (and helpful, some would say) use for Krazy Glue.

The colder, dryer weather brings its own set of special seasonal skin problems, including very painful fingertip or heel cracks. But as painful as they may be, they're amazingly easy to fix, especially if you treat them early. Once cracks appear, 24/7, apply a generous amount of any ointment like Vaseline, Aquaphor, or antibiotic ointments like Bacitracin and Polysporin, and cover the ointment immediately with a Band-Aid. Reapply as often as needed to keep the ointment in, and within two to three days you'll see a great improvement. And, as crazy as this may sound, if you catch that crack early, and don't want to reapply ointments and wear Band-Aids, apply a few layers of Krazy Glue over the crack. You'll get rapid healing and pain relief. When it's better, don't pick off the dried glue; allow it to peel off naturally in one to two weeks.

I'm sorry, doctor, but that's nuts. There is no good reason to avoid Band-Aids, Steri-Strips (which were designed to close wounds), or other products that don't require weeks to peel off naturally. The directions for Krazy Glue are very specific about avoiding skin contact. I'm sure the Krazy Glue makers were serious. Doctors use prescription drugs for off-label purposes, but I've never heard of using Krazy Glue for off-label skin problems. I think this situation calls for a warning: Don't try this at home.

If you would like to see his tips - and others that actually make sense - head over to DermTV.

Photo courtesy of Amazon

22 comments:

Eileen said...

Actually, cyanoacrylate adhesives were used in trauma surgery during the Vietnam war to close and seal wounds and they were used in Europe long before being approved for medical use in this country. Since octyl-2-cyanoacrylate was approved for multiple uses in the US, it has gained wide acceptance in the medical community and amongst veterinarians. Musicians in particular love the stuff for treating fingertip cuts. I'd think the biggest problem would be in applying it without getting it places you don't want it and, of course, you'd want to make sure the laceration was clean and sterile before gluing it together. Personally, I have no problem with just slapping some antibiotic cream on a cut and covering it with a band-aid, but I'm sure there are those occasional when that just isn't practical. Interesting, no?

tweenymama said...

What Eileen said: exactly what I clicked on to say. Also, quilters use it to toughen skin and to cover the small, multiple jabs incurred by, yes, jabbing the skin with a needle. I would use it!

Charleston Girl said...

Hey y'all,

This is what Krazy Glue has to say about that, which I did review before I posted.

Cyanoacrylate proved valuable to military surgeons during the Vietnam War.

Under battlefield conditions, they could use the material to close wounds and stop bleeding. Today, specific formulations of cyanoacrylate have been developed for medical use.

Instant Krazy Glue products should not be used for wound care.

I put my faith in their fair warning. Plus, it's too darn easy to use other, safe products.

Charleston Girl said...

Tweenymama,

Here ya go for the knitters: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/874047-overview

Ask your doc to get some.

Chris said...

This is my first time posting- I am a long time reader and love your blog! As a medical professional and someone who suffers with cracks on both thumbs and index fingers I can say crazy glue works! The crack heals from the bottom up and the glue fills in the space while it heals- it does not bring the skin together per se but fills the space while its healing so it is not so painful. It is especially useful when cream and bandaids aren't practical-esp. while working in the hospital and constantly washing hands! We use glue in the OR to close the skin of surgical wounds- a little different because it does approximate the edges together-sealing it closed.

Chris El @ MyFashionTrendencies said...

I'm a fan of your blog, and also in the healthcare field and I've also known this as a quick remedy to a cut when you're in a bind. It works!

Anonymous said...

They used glue on my c section instead is stitches. Dr said it was basically medical super glue. Also my son cut his head open and they also used glue instead of stitches.

bluematilda said...

hi! so back in the day when i danced (modern and classical ballet) the bottoms of my feet would crack and i'd use crazy glue to glue my feet back together. usually right below the ball of the foot, it was unpleasant! :) there was a better product called nu-skin i believe that had some kind of antiseptic, but both were helpful!

Anonymous said...

In the bitter cold, finger cracks can be really bad. Krazy Glue has to post such a warning, CG, because of the crazies in this country and the litigiousness that's rampant. FDA would have a field day.

Medical glue, "dermabond" and Krazy all have the basic cyanoacrylate adhesive. It's safe and it works. It peels off in a few days leaving behind united dermis and epidermis. Don't knock it 'till you try it.

Charleston Girl said...

Hey there, Chris, you are a good person to ask. When there are medical grade cyanoacrylate adhesives available, why would you use Krazy Glue?

Charleston Girl said...

You too Chris El. See question in comment above.

Lisa Brown said...

I use "crazy glue" on cuts all the time. Seals the wound, allows the skin to heal quick, actually. I keep it in the house and medicine cabinet at all times.

Charleston Girl said...

Hi Bluematilda,

My heels crack open every winter, and it's very painful. I try to remember to use 12% lactic acid on them every night. When I forget, I apply Vasoline and put on cotton socks over it. Both remedies really help.

Charleston Girl said...

Well, Anonymous,

You stick with Krazy Glue. I'm going to use stuff that won't say on my skin until the cells shed off.

Anonymous said...

It isn't QUITE as crazy as it sounds. During the Vietnam War, emergency medics began using the all-purpose glue to seal battle wounds in troops headed for surgery. The glue was so good at stemming bleeding that it was credited with saving many lives.

Nowadays, professional athletes often close small cuts with Super Glue or similar products to get back in the game in a hurry. The glues are also used by veterinarians, and many people keep a tube around the house to help them out of a medical pinch. It is believed that the glues — made from the chemical cyanoacrylate — not only stop bleeding quickly, but also lead to less scarring.

So should you keep some Super Glue in the medicine cabinet? Probably not, experts say. Studies show that although the glue can be useful in emergencies, it can also irritate the skin, kill cells and cause other side effects, particularly when used on deep wounds.

There is a safer alternative. In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration approved a similar, antibacterial form of the substance called 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate, which is marketed as Dermabond.

Bellyhead said...

This is the most interesting beauty-blog post and comments I've read all week! CG, you bring out all the most interesting stuff!

Charleston Girl said...

Hi Bellyhead,

This feature fell into my lap when I received a press release. I just had to share it!

Charleston Girl said...

Totally agree, Anonymous. Some of the info you presented is contained in the comments above. I wanted to remind everyone that the war was in the '60s, and we've come a long way, baby.

I agree with your conclusion. I'll be reaching for Dermabond.

Anonymous said...

Hi Charlestongitl,

I was asked by a dermatologist to "super clue my thumb one time" I am a physical therapist who does a lot of manual therapy (in addition to frequent hand washing." My thumb would split open and it will take months to heal. An RN friend saw my thumb one time and thought it needed stiches, it was that deep. The dermatologist then told me to super clue it ( a few ER doctors confirmed that I should try the trick). I dared not.
Daisy

DivaDebbi said...

Naturally I was hoping this was for fine lines and wrinkles CG!!! LoL.

Brenda Penton said...

I've thankfully never had an cuts or cracks that have had me considering using Krazy Glue, but I have family members who use it is occasionally and many swear by it.

Abby In Wonderland said...

536I've heard this trick recommended by lots of docs and athletes. I am a rock climber and occasionally get cracks in my heels or hands. In a pinch, super glue works great with no lasting ill effects. I find that you don't really need as much as this person recommends and it often doesn't take that long to wear away. It's probably not much worse than the many other chemicals to which we expose our skin on a daily basis!